Kay: When Agencies Go Rogue

By now, probably many of you have heard the news about Donadio & Olson, the New York–based literary agency, whose bookkeeper stole $3.4 million (or more) from the agency’s clients, its writers. One of these writers is Chuck Palahniuk, who has written 24 books so far, including Fight Club, which was turned into a film. None of the royalties, advance monies, or film-option payments were turned over to him, leaving him “almost broke,” he says in an incredible and heartbreaking blog post.

I briefly had an agent at one time, and I never had to get into trust issues with her, because she never sold the book she’d taken on for me. But I’d wondered about the language in the standard contract she sent—how your royalties or advances go from the publisher to the agent, who takes her cut and then sends the rest to the writer, supposedly in 10 days or two weeks or so. You really have to trust the agent, I thought, but because this woman was a friend of a friend, and because she’d signed on with all the usual agents organizations, I did trust her. Continue reading

Kay: Little Women Celebrates 150 Years

Louisa May Alcott

Did you read Little Women when you were a kid? Did you like it?

Published in 1868, this story is one that the world seems never to tire of. There have been two silent film adaptations and four talkies so far. Six television series have been produced, including four by the BBC, and two anime series in Japan. A 1998 American opera version has been performed internationally. A musical version opened on Broadway in 2005.

And now, 150 years after it was written, two filmed productions will be released in 2018.

So one could say it’s an enduring story.

Continue reading

Kay: Going Long at the Berkeley Book Festival

Last weekend, our Elizabeth, who lives just down the road from me, and I decided to go hear Catherine Coulter interviewed at the Berkeley Book Festival. This annual event, held in downtown Berkeley, California, attracts thousands of visitors, who can hear famous and not-as-famous writers talk about a wide variety of topics and, between panels, browse the many booths that crowd Berkeley’s Civic Center Park and the surrounding streets. This is the third year I’ve attended, and I’ve always enjoyed it, but this year the weather was cold and blustery, so lingering over intriguing new titles in gale-force winds was not in the cards. Elizabeth and I pretty much steamed our way through the booths in an effort to keep warm.

I was interested in hearing Catherine Coulter speak because she started her career writing shorter, category-length Regency historicals, Continue reading

Kay: An Agent’s Nightmares

The Nightmare (Henry Fuseli, 1781)

Several of the Ladies have committed to pursuing indie publishing careers; others are more interested in a traditional path. Each strategy has its pluses and minuses, so whichever way is best for the individual, or whichever way opens to an author, will work.

We’ve given some thought here at Eight Ladies to what it’s like being an author, especially the difficulties thereof, but most of us don’t think very hard about the publishers’ side of the equation. I recently ran across a [hilarious] Twitter feed from an agent, describing the difficulties of her work. For those of you who’d like to read the original thread, go here. For those who don’t want to click through, I’m quoting the rest here.

The thread is from Ginger Clark, a literary agent at Curtis Brown. Continue reading

Jilly: Aliens or Werewolves? Why?

If you were stranded on a desert island or snowed up in an isolated cabin and you could have only one novel to read, would you choose shifters or aliens? You don’t know the author. You don’t get to see the cover or read the blurb, you just have to choose a sub-genre. Fantasy/urban fantasy, or sci-fi?

My question arises courtesy of an explanation I read this week on Ilona Andrews’ blog. Like many of their fans, I am super-excited about their current Innkeeper serial, a novel posted in free instalments every Friday.

Sweep of the Blade is a courtship story between Maud, a human who was previously married to an asshat vampire and has sworn off the species for good, and Arland, a swoon-worthy alpha male vampire of aristocratic lineage who’s unshakeably in love with her and makes no secret of it. He persuades her to accompany him to his home planet, and high-octane high jinks ensue. The story features hierarchical, militaristic vampire dynasties in space, family politics, deadly conspiracies, and some serious arse-kicking delivered by Maud and her young daughter, Helen. It’s clever, moving, funny, exciting, and kind.

Apparently fans have been writing to the authors to squee about the story and to ask why they don’t quit writing their other series so we can all have more Innkeeper. Among a handful of reasons, Ilona offered this explanation:

Innkeeper is a SF at its core. Aliens are a harder sell than werewolves. 🙂 A lot of people who would actually like Innkeeper, if they gave it a shot, read the description and walk away from it because it has Science Fiction elements.

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Kay: Golden Contests

For writers who want to get sincere feedback on their pages, contests are one option to hear from judges who won’t have any inhibitions about criticizing a friend’s work. In addition to any critique, finaling—and especially winning—a big contest can bring the attention of agents and editors, not to mention fame and fortune, to the author.

Three years ago, our own Jeanne Estridge won the Golden Heart, a contest for unpublished romance authors. It’s a big deal, with more than 1,500 entries. We were all there to whoop it up when her name was announced. (She’s finaled again this year, and we have our fingers crossed.)

However, not everyone is a romance writer, Continue reading

Kay: Quiz for Y’all—Who Gets Run Over?

from DadsRoundTable.com

I’ve been buzzing along on the WIP, everything going pretty well, and then today, I ran into a conundrum. I could tell I was stuck, because I wrote 1,000 words today, and I knew the instant I was done that it sucked. I’ve thought about this problem all day, and I can’t figure it out. Help, please!

In this scene, my antagonist, Vlad, the Russian assassin, has stolen a car. He’s enraged because Phoebe, my heroine, has just broken into his hotel room and stolen back the data. He must retaliate.

Vlad knows where the safe house is, so he’s off to hurt someone, anyone (that’s the “blind with rage” thing going on). I want him to run over one of my characters. Who? That’s my question. (Don’t worry, nobody dies. I think nobody will even be hurt. Maybe a little.)

There’s a lot of people living in the safe house. Here are your options: Continue reading