Nancy: The Fine Art of Receiving a Critique

Last week, Jeanne discussed critiquing manuscripts for newbie writers, and yesterday Justine talked about revising (and revising, and revising!) the opening chapters of the first book in her historical romance series. With both of these posts on my mind and no less than three (three!) revisions of my own to complete, from minor tweaks in one story to major revisions in another to something in between on the third, today I’m thinking about the best way to bridge the gap between getting back comments from a trusted critiquer and putting a revision plan into action.

We’ve discussed a lot of the steps I’m going to suggest here at 8LW in the past, and much of the way the Ladies approach critique work is based on the guidance Jenny Crusie* gave us while we studied with her in our McDaniel writing program. But with so many of us knee deep (or eyeballs deep) in the critique and revision process, let’s revisit some of the basics, ICYMI (or ICYNAR – in case you need a refresher). Continue reading

Michaeline: #ThatDress: Or how we see light and words

White dress with lavender scarf . . . right? (Or is it a gray dress with a pink scarf? Or a blue dress with purple scarf? Or . . . ?) Via Wikimedia Commons

White dress with lavender scarf . . . right? (Or is it a gray dress with a pink scarf? Or a blue dress with purple scarf? Or . . . ?) Via Wikimedia Commons

Today’s blog post is a result of a smash-up of some critique work I’ve been doing this month, and The Dress controversy that I stumbled upon on Twitter yesterday.

If you haven’t heard, somebody posted a picture of a dress. Some people saw it as blue and black, others saw it as white and gold, and it seems like only a few people saw it like I did: pale blue with a tawdry sort of brown lace trimming. Argument ensued — passionate argument where all parties thought they were right, and were befuddled that others didn’t see things their way. This article on io9 sums up the controversy quite well, I think. (-: They also provide the “right” answer.

But this blogpost isn’t about the “right” answer – it’s about what people saw. Continue reading