Nancy: May Recap – Books of My Heart

All_you_need_is_love_(The_Beatles_Story)

It’s that time again! Time for my monthly (if belated) keepin’-it-real post about my writing progress. This time, we turn our attention to May, in which the writer does lots of career/publishing research-type things. I also had some important story/series breakthroughs and made solid progress on the writing front.

Marketing My Girls. Back in April, as I recalibrated my writing schedule and started pulling myself out of the writing doldrums to which I’d fallen prey during the first bleak months of 2015, I also knew it was time to start marketing My Girls. In April, I researched agents and ranked them based on those I thought would be the best fit for me and for my work. In May, I took the next step, submitting queries and partial manuscripts to the first several agents on my list. Nothing to report yet, positive or negative, but if I start to get rejections, I’ll move onto the next set of agents/agencies on my list. And I’ll have to do it, since it’s all on my marketing spreadsheet, and we all know the spreadsheet rules! Continue reading

Mindy Klasky, Guest Blogger: Rapid Release Publishing or One Writer’s Tale of Madness

Hello all! Today it is my pleasure to introduce my good friend, fellow author, and all-around font of writing and publishing knowledge, Mindy Klasky. Please give Mindy a warm 8LW welcome, and in the comments, feel free to ask questions about romance and fantasy writing, as well as traditional, hybrid, and self-publishing options. Mindy will be stopping back throughout the day to answer. – Nancy

Klasky - Perfect Pitch

My, how things change… Way back in the Dark Ages, in 1998, I signed my first publishing contract. PenguinPutnam bought a fantasy novel, its sequel, and a book to be named later. That “book to be named later” was actually the novel I wrote while my agent was shopping around the one that sold – another fantasy, in a totally different world, with totally different characters.

I’ll spare you the long, boring discussion, but my agent, editor, and I invested hours trying to solve the problem of when to bring out that “book to be named later.” Conventional wisdom said no one would buy two books by the same author in a year, so we either needed to save the book till the end of the first series or use a pen name. (Ultimately, we did neither; we brought out a second Mindy Klasky book in a year. It flopped.)

Today, new authors would laugh uproariously at such a decision.

Today, the mantra is publish, publish fast, publish early. Just publish.

That mantra is chanted a thousand times louder and faster when the author in question is self-publishing. Amazon, the largest distributor of self-published fiction, relies on a complicated series of algorithms to promote its books. Continue reading