Michaeline: The Benefits of Goofing Off on the Internet

A woman with a pen in her hand contemplating a blank sheet of paper.

Think, think, think. (Image via Wikimedia Commons)

So, long story short: my friend and I were texting this morning about various womanly complaints, and she said Amazon has now got a sparkly menstrual cup on offer. It’s the kind of idea that hits you in the middle of the forehead with a solid slug of “Why?” and then slaps you on the back of the head with a good, “Why not?” The things are becoming more popular, and I suppose there’s now a market for sparkly menstrual cups. (Note: I can’t actually find such a thing on Amazon now, but now that it’s out there, it seems like it should be an idea.)

But of course, this reminded me of the Glittery Hoo-Ha, and Jennifer Crusie’s post about it. HER friend, Lani Diane Rich (aka Lucy March and other names) had brought up with half-serious literary theory about why the hero loves the heroine and only her – even though she is a diamond in the rough, or in this case, even though he’s a man who enjoys women and enjoys have sex with many, many women.

You’ll have to read it, and the comments (and the second page of comments when there so many that the blog broke), but the gist is that once he has dipped his wick in her glittery hoo-ha, no other hoo-ha will do for him. He’s in love, and ready to be faithful.

This random summer surfing came at a great time: I’ve got some empty hours coming up this week, and I’ve been thinking about the multiple problems of my work in progress (WIP). Right now, the conflict box is pretty weak. (Conflict box a mystery? Let’s raid Jenny’s blog again, with a fabulous explanation of Michael Hauge’s conflict box here.) My heroine’s goal is Continue reading

Elizabeth: Beat Refresher

As I mentioned last week, I’ve recently been working my way through an iPod full of writing podcasts that I have accumulated over the past several years.  The most recent one was a 2014 StoryWonk Sunday podcast called Dodge ex Machina.  The podcast, which featured Lani Diane Rich, is now defunct, but the insights on story and craft and a whole lot more are still valuable.

This particular podcast provided a great example, via an improv session, on how to structure the beats in a scene.  I found the reminder very helpful, so I thought I’d share the information here, just in case anyone else out there would like a refresher.  It’s also a fun exercise that you may want to do on your own, or may want to try with an actual scene you are working on (or may be stuck on).

So, let’s get started. Continue reading

Elizabeth: Story Improv

writing_sessionMy To-Be-Read pile of books is eclipsed only by my To-Be-Listened-To collection of podcasts. In an attempt to make some headway, I’ve been listening to a podcast instead of my usual playlist during my gym workouts (bonus: it makes the time go by faster). Right now I’m working my way through the StoryWonk Sunday writing podcasts by Lani Diane Rich and Alastair Stephens.  The podcasts ran from 2012 through 2014, but discussions about story and narrative don’t go out of style and there have been some really thought-provoking discussions.

Anyway, in one of the episodes I listened to last week they did an improv segment Continue reading

Nancy: Links, Learning, and Laughs

Surfer's View

While Jilly’s been building her TBR list for her staycation later this summer, I’ve been out surfing. Sadly (or on second thought, happily), this hasn’t involved a longboard or bitchin’ waves. I’ve been surfing the web from the safety of my own home, and I’ve run across some great writing- and story-related inspiration. Here are links to a few of the sites I’ve enjoyed the most this past week. If you’ve run across a must-see website for hopeless procrastinators writers, please share in the comments!

A different kind of writing book. First up is a link to a book. I’ve known about and been anticipating this release for months. No, it’s not a sweeping romance, a cozy mystery, or a great women’s fiction read. Continue reading

Kat: Featuring Lani Diane Rich, NYT Bestselling Author

Lucy March, Lani Diane Rich

“That Touch of Magic” by Lucy March

Today is Halloween (Happy Haunting, everyone!) . Even more exciting, today is the eve of the start of NaNoWriMo 2014. For these reasons (and more), I think it altogether appropriate to introduce you to the first previously unpublished author to publish a NaNoWriMo manuscript. Lani Diane Rich wrote her first book, “Time Off for Good Behavior” during NaNoWriMo. To top that feat, she won the Rita Award for “Best First Book” proving critics who said a good book could not be written in thirty days, wrong.

I came to Lani’s party late. If it hadn’t been for our McD professor talking about her BFF’s and writing partners, “Lani” and “Krissy” (Author Anne Stuart), I never would have picked up one of her books. Both Lani and Krissy sounded like funny, smart women. Women I could hang out with, but since asking for an introduction seemed inappropriate (read, stalker), I reached for their books instead. And really, isn’t that the best way to hang out with a writer? Continue reading