Elizabeth: Goodbye Jo Beverley

Elizabeth with Jo Beverley during a "Get Caught Reading at Sea" cruise

Elizabeth with Jo Beverley during a “Get Caught Reading at Sea” cruise

I was so sad to read about Jo Beverley’s passing this morning when I finally logged onto the internet after several days of electronic vacation.

She is one of handful of authors whose books always made it to my keeper shelf to be read, re-read, and enjoyed over and over again.  I am on my second and third copies of many of her books.

It was her writing that triggered my love of Georgian and Regency history, as well as all things English, when I began reading historical romance novels.

Lord of My Heart is the first book of hers that I read.  As one reviewer said, it was “witty, slightly bawdy, [and] gently emotional without being overly sentimental.”    The characters were wonderfully drawn and the story captivating, and by the time I had finished it I was well and truly hooked.

“Love is too mild a word.  You are to me as my heart is to me.” ~ Aimery de Gaillard, Lord of My Heart

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Elizabeth: That’s My Story

A fan of happily-ever-after from an early age.

A fan of happily-ever-after from an early age.

In her post on Sunday, Jilly talked about the kinds of things that would be an immediate turn off when considering a new book. Judging by the comments, we all have pretty strong ideas about what doesn’t work for us when it comes to our choice of reading material. The discussion got me to thinking about the flip side: what would get me to take a chance on a new book?

In the McDaniel program we talked about how an interesting cover can be a great way to catch a reader’s attention (harder for eBooks, but still possible). At the recent RWA conference I noticed that I was drawn to a number of book covers featuring cupcakes or cake (it’s possible I was hungry at the time) while other covers caught my attention with interesting titles and artwork. Regardless of what caught my eye initially, it was the story teaser on the back cover and the first few pages of the story that helped me decide what books I put back down and which ones I was willing to schlep all the way back home. Continue reading