Jilly: Magic Stars – A Dark, Beautiful Promise

magic_stars_smWhen I read that my favorite fantasy author, Ilona Andrews, planned to self-publish a novella in time for Christmas, I did the happy dance. Then I learned that the protagonist of Magic Stars was Derek, an important and much-loved secondary character from the bestselling Kate Daniels series, and I started counting the days.

There was no chance of me saving this book for a holiday treat. I applied for and was lucky enough to receive an ARC, which arrived in my in-box just before 11pm one night. Suffice it to say I didn’t go early to bed 😉 .

It’s no criticism to say this book is not what I was expecting. It was much, much more.

Continue reading

Nancy: Putting the Bromance in Romance

bromanceOne of the themes that emerges in my writing, regardless of genre, is the importance of friendship in getting to the ‘stable world’ at the end of the story. Friendships among my female characters tend to arise naturally. So when I built the arc for my Victorian Romance series around five old friends/schoolmates from Harrow, the heroes of the stories, I thought I had a handle on these male friendships and how they’d grown, changed, and in some cases disintegrated over the years. Only when I got to revisions in book one did I realize that two of these friends who’d had a significant falling out needed to repair their friendship to move not only the plot of the first book, but also the arc of the series.

I’m going to dispense with the formalities of titles for purposes of this blog post, so the friends in question are Daniel (book 1 hero) and Edward (book 2 hero). These two are destined to cross paths and proverbial swords because our heroine, Emmeline, is both Daniel’s love interest and Edward’s sister. While each man loves Emmeline dearly in his own way, each believes he knows what’s best for her future (not-so-spoilery spoiler: their ideas of ‘best for Emmeline’ are different, and Emmeline doesn’t give a toss about their opinions of her life anyway).

In the first draft, I had Daniel and Edward sniping and verbally sparring, and eventually begrudgingly joining forces to do the right thing. That was all very nice and fine and good, but there wasn’t a lot of juice in their storyline. And what fun is it to read (or write!) about characters when there’s no juice? So I set out to make these former friends angrier, more intractable, and more diametrically opposed. Of course, you can’t have an immovable object meet an irresistible force without ensuing fireworks. And those fireworks? It turns out they’re the juice in the Daniel/Edward subplot.  Continue reading