Michaeline: The Physically Fit Writer

This is in honor of Japanese Physical Education Day which is next Monday. (Three day weekend! Whoo-hoo!) Via Wikimedia Commons (Fun fact from Wikipedia: One Glico Caramel was 15.4 kCal, or exactly the amount some people need to run 300 meters. Or, according to my studies, power 12 minutes of furious typing.)

This is in honor of Japanese Physical Education Day which is next Monday. (Three day weekend! Whoo-hoo!) Via Wikimedia Commons (Fun fact from Wikipedia: One Glico Caramel was 15.4 kCal, or exactly the amount some people need to run 300 meters. Or, according to my studies, power 12 minutes of furious typing.)

The physically fit writer: the phrase feels a little bit like an oxymoron to me. My dream image of a writer is someone nibbling at salty snacks and consuming vast amounts of liquid that medical authorities at one time or another have shuddered about, all while slumping in a chair, stressing over a keyboard. God, that’s the life, isn’t it?

LOL, OK, it’s a nightmare in reality. All that slumping messes with your breathing, and anyone who has the internet has probably seen the health warnings at one time or another, painted in lurid electrons of threat and menace.

And, thanks to the share-all aspects of the internet, we can often find writers talking about how exercise and health work for them.

MURAKAMI Haruki particularly comes to mind. He was in the news this week for his Nobel Prize nomination. (Didn’t get it. Again. But such is writing life. Sometimes the misses are very honorable and worthy things in themselves.) There’s a wonderful article here (The Atlantic Online, essay/interview by Mohsin Hamid in Joe Fassler’s series on writing.) about how he began exercising how it inspired another writer to start moving his body as well as his brain.

OK, so that’s it. It’s a beautiful fall weekend somewhere. (And a beautiful spring weekend for our friends in the southern hemisphere.) The trees are putting on their finery, the weather hasn’t gotten too extreme in temperature yet, and we need to enjoy it after the terrors of the past season, and the rigors of the future season. I hope you’ll share your exercise and writing experiences in the comments, and any other good stories or news.

4 thoughts on “Michaeline: The Physically Fit Writer

  1. This is the first time in ages that I’ve been so busy with Other Things, I’ve had no time at all to write. It’s been a valuable reminder of how lucky I am, because I’ve really missed my WIP. I’m desperate to get back to Cam and Mary and I’m hoping that feeling will make me super-productive when I get there.

    I’m ducking the exercise question because I need to do better. I want to write first, walk later, but then I get so wrapped up in what I’m doing, I don’t want to break off. So I have to figure out how to make it happen later in the day, or change my approach and do it first. It’s on my list to deal with when I get my writing life back on track 😉 .

    • Gosh, I know. We have so much that should be done. Exericise is on my list, so is cleaning, gardening . . . and I have a child taking entrance exams in February and a job outside the home, so writing often gets buried in the fog of exhaustion, if nothing else.

      And writing is so much fun when it’s working, so it’s a real pity. Oh well, November is a good time to write, even if it isn’t all about a full-out NaNo marathon. A stroll through the opening scenes is a good starter.

      December is going to be the real stinker.

  2. I am fortunate to have a walking trail in the hills close to my home, so I walk almost every day. Not only is it good for my health, it is also my favorite way to work out plot problems, characters, world building – anything I’m stuck on. My writing always goes better if I’ve had my walk that day.

    My chair encourages slumping. In fact, it makes it difficult to sit straight, so I’m trying to find a chair that’s better for me yet I can actually afford. I know at least one author who switched to a walking desk – a treadmill with a desk attached. She seems to be more productive and says her back problems disappeared almost instantly when she began to use it.

    • (-: I am so sorry. I kind of just wandered away from the internet for a few weeks. Your hills sound like a good place to work out — your body and the plot!

      The chair thing is such a problem. Slumping makes it harder to breathe, which means less oxygen to the brain, among other things. I think frequent breaks from the computer is a good thing, but when one is in that groove it’s so hard to get up and walk across the room or do some jumping jacks . . . .

      I would like to try the walking desk. Maybe I should find a standing desk first (-:.

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